SN 2024bch: a bright type IIn supernova in NGC 3206

A new and very bright supernova has been detected on January 29, 2024. It is characterized a type IIn and is located in NGC 3206. Nicely visible throughout the night from the Northern hemisphere this also seems to be a really nice target for amateur astronomers…

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Hello, with my Unistellar eQuinox2 I see that SN. I live near Paris in France .
date 20240131
time 1914 to 1938utc
no filter
exposure 4000ms
SN 2024bch (20240131) eQuinox2

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Well done Nicolas. Congrats for the image.

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Continuing the discussion from A bright type IIn supernova in NGC 3206:

We spectroscopically observed this SN at Observatoire de Haute Provence in the framework of the Aix Marseille University Physic M2 OHP internship, with 8 students, with the MISTRAL instrument on the T193 telescope. We got red spectra (6000-10000A) on the night of
the 02/02/2024, at 2h09 and 2h27 UT (2x15min). We also got blue spectra (4500-8000) on the night of 03/02/2024, at 23h16 and 23h32 UT (2x15min).

Raw data are available at: https://amubox.univ-amu.fr/s/fisfTdaoTM5MM7W
This place has the raw data (2D spectra, 2D calib files, spectrophotometric standard star) and
the 1D reduction spectra under the form of fits files for individual spectra, and txt files for the
stacked spectra.

Flux calibration was made by comparison to Hiltner600


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Hi all,
I’m an astronomer from the UK - I just wanted to say that this is awesome work! I’ve had a look at the reduced spectrum, and used a couple of classification tools (snid, superfit) to compare it to literature events.
It’s an excellent match to a SNIIn @ z=0.004 (where the redshift is measured from the Halpha line). I’ve attached a couple of comparison plots.
I think the classification is clear. I would definitely suggest uploading the results to TNS if you’d feeling confident: it’s the best spectrum I’ve seen of this object!
Really nice work!
Best wishes

Mat
-



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Thanks! Interresting result, Indeed! I ll put the spectra on TNS tomorrow, ok. On the comments, may i put a few words of your modélisations? Something to suggest? Numbers, names, affiliations?
Observations were with a 2m class, in pretty good conditions. So it probably explains thé good signal :slightly_smiling_face:

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Spectra available on TNS. Do we put an Atel to include your modelisation Mat?

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Congratulations Christophe and everyone :-).

I think that most of the optical transient community have moved to TNS for transient reporting. A significant fraction of the community in the USA still use ATELs to distribute results though, so if you feel like releasing one then go for it! For the classification software, you can reference “SNID (Blondin & Tonry, 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024)” and “superfit (Howell et al. 2005, Ap.J. 634, 1190)”.

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And a 2m telescope sounds great!
Have you considered trying to classify some fainter objects? You can find a starting list here : ZTF Bright Transient Survey

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The used telescope (T193) and instrument (MISTRAL) are part of the Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP). This is an observatory run by the french research agency INSU/CNRS. Observing time is allocated in regular calls for proposals. I am not aware of a program following up on ZTF transients (yet)…

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